Through the Bible

This hermeneutic approach to reading the Bible, originally written in the 1980s, uses four levels of interpretation: literal, allegorical, homiletic (moral) and mystical. Halliday says “The Bible is a book in code”, meaning it is not to be taken literally. His purpose in studying the Bible is “To clarify for ourselves our own significance and ultimate destiny within the universal plan which these scriptures outline for us.” He begins at the beginning, by defining the meaning of ‘beginning’ and goes on to interpret the meaning of Bible stories; The Garden of Eden; The Fall; Cain and Abel; the stories of Noah and Abraham; the Parables and Life of Jesus. He defines and interprets terms such as ‘love’ and ‘joy’; explains the relationship of time and eternity. His topics are still highly topical today: he relates scientific ideas to the understanding of the relationship between spirit, mind and matter; he draws on parallels in other religions. For example, he explains how Hindus, Muslims, Jews and Christians find a path, “To regain our lost unity of Will.” Halliday ends with an explanation that “The books of the Bible have been written … in order to show man, as in a mirror, what kind of being he is, and what kind of being he may become. … Human beings are capable of all deeds of good and evil”. He gives definitions of the meaning of the terms ‘good’ and ‘evil’ – “The good is that which leads us towards more wholeness. The evil is that which leads us to disintegration”. He guides us to see our potential for choice.

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